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The 2010 Munich Show Displays

There were three very interesting mineral based displays this year at the show.  I will start with the display of insects and minerals.  Regrettably I can not recall the name of the collector who owns this collection but it was quite fascinating to see the contrast between insects and minerals of similar colors and textures.

 

The large poster at the entrance to the display.

 

Sulfur and Butterflies.
 
 

Beast is a word that comes to mind here...
 
 
.
 

.
A butterfly and brochantite.
 
 
A moth and agate.
 
 
A butterfly and feldspar (labradorite).
 
Another beast !
 
A butterfly and brochantite.
 
 

In hall A-5 there were numerous displays of material from personal collections.  The first one here is youtube video with a dazzling specimen of lime green titanite from Austria.


 




One of the displays that was extraordinary for this set of displays was the group of fluorite specimens put out by Spirifer Mineral Society.  Tomascz Praszkier is the leader of this society and he told me that that dozen or so specimens was the creme de la creme of over 20 years in the various quarries which are found in the Strzegom-Sobotka Massif.  Below are just a few of the remarkable specimens that were in this display. They have all been effectively backlit to reveal the stunning color.
 
 
 
 
 
One of the displays that I always look for is that of Bernhard Sick.  Dr. Sick is noted for his outstanding collection of historical labels and specimens.  I am sure he has one of the more comprehensive collections of this sort of just about any private collector.  This year he and several others assembled a group of specimens from the Garbari collection.

 

 

A specimen of fluorite from Baveno, Italy.
 

A specimen of stephanite from Eisenbach, Germany.
 
 
In the center of Hall A-5 was a group of displays dedicated to the collectors and strahlers (field collectors) who are focused on the minerals found in the various alpine regions of Europe - most notably Mount Blanc area near Chamonix, France.  The displays were simply incredible!  On Sunday there was a celebration for this esteemed group and I was kindly allowed to enter this exclusive area by Johannes Keilmann.  Below is a group playing music typical of this region. Near the end of the video you will see Johannes Keilmann arranging tables for the group to use while they enjoyed the glasses of champagne, sausages and pretzels - quite delicious by the way!
 
 
 
 

The ceiling banners making it easy to locate the collections.

 


In attendance was Miss Germany who was photographed with many of the collectors and strahlers. Alain Martaud is in the violet shirt.

 


A group of the collectors and strahlers.


You know there is NOTHING easy about collecting in these treacherous mountain cliffs.  The strahlers spend days suspended by ropes - both sleeping, eating, collecting, and every other aspect of daily life.  There were two enclaves where the strahlers were featured. Looks like fun eh? Actually, it does!

 

 

a large cabinet specimen of red fluorite and smoky quartz from Mt. Blanc.  It was interesting to hear the varying
opinions about this specimen from clunky to beyond incredible. Me? I will trend towards beyond incredible!

 

This is what the area looked like on Wednesday... It is simply amazing how much work gets done to set the show up...
This is the bandstand area in case you were wondering where the youtube video was taken.
 
The following are images under the Alpine Banner.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This year the theme of the show as minerals from Brazil.  There were some absolutely INCREDIBLE specimens on display here.  Way more than I could hope to photograph - especially with the endless crowds of people there to see these pieces.  I apologize to those collectors whose names are not with their pieces.  Where at all possible I photographed the name of the collector along with the specimen. That was not always possible though.
 
 
 

 


At the entrance was this enormous smoky quartz with green elbaite.


A specimen from Pederneira. Not many people realize that EVERY large specimen like this is brought to the surface in a cigar box.  This mine is a feldspar mine and no attempt is made to collect specimens before they are blasted to kingdom come.  When pockets are encountered the fragments are collected and pieced together later in a lab somewhere.  They are also usually enhanced with some epoxy as not all of the pieces are always found... So in essence these are a sort of "Frankenstein" rock.

 


Spectacular reconstructed specimen of elbaite!!!

 



 


 


 


 


A large collection of the ever popular tourmalines from the Jonas Mine.


 


 


A candid shot of Brazilian dealer Luiz Menezes.

 


 

 

 

 

 


A gigantic gem kunzite from the Urucum mine.  

 

Some final thoughts on the 2010 Munich Show. I had some very interesting conversations with a wide and diverse group of people from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean here at the show.  Prices being asked for top specimens continue to get closer to the sun in an Icarus fashion it seems but still they keep climbing.  I spoke with some very high end collectors and the feelings are not universally shared on whether there will be some sort of "correction" or if prices of the top pieces will continue to defy gravity.  I have encouraged any collector who can afford to plunk $25,000 or more for a single specimen to pursue a path of education about what constitutes an important specimen.  Price alone is not the only measure as you can find similar specimens all over the show priced all over the place.  You will always do best, if spending the time to get smarter is not possible, to get second opinions - only where it is appropriate to do so of course.

It was nice to see some new finds of significance. I believe the alabandite specimens are probably the most important in terms of mineralogical importance.  I also think that there might be more of these to come in the future as the vein that produced these specimens is still being worked. It is impossible to know for sure though.  Also the new Chinese ilvaite specimens could be the tip of another Dal'Negorsk "Ice Berg". You never know with China.  

I am also hearing from many international dealers that, due to ever increasing border/customs measures being adopted by the United States, that Munich is fast becoming the place where more and more of the new finds from places like the mid-east and northern Africa are likely to be found.  And I am not alone in my perception that the Munich Show is without question, the best organized and most amazing mineral event on Earth.  Imagine four buildings - each larger than the Convention Center in Tucson - empty on Tuesday and then empty again the following Monday. And in between millions of minerals, fossils, gemstones, etc. are arranged, displays assembled, filled, emptied and disassembled, thousands of people arrive and depart and then it is over. It really is the single, greatest mineral event on our planet.  

For me the scores of people here were the real treat. It is always a pleasure for me to put email addresses together with real human beings. It is also gratifying to have conversations with many people that I see only once a year or so and catch up. Then there are the faces that appear everywhere I go.  Some people I know very well and others, we simply nod and acknowledge that we recognize one another and continue on with "the hunt".

I will be working on a large update of specimens I found at the show when I get back home to Weaverville on the 5th.  I would expect to have most of the minerals on the web sometime soon after the 10th of November.   I will send out a note to my mailing list when the update is completed.

I would like to thank the Keilmanns for their tireless energy and generosity

Thanks for checking in on what was new in Munich . I will be back here again in 2011.

Mineralogical Cheers,

 

 


 
 

Past Shows & Reports
PLEASE NOTE: The minerals that were offered on these pages are all sold
1999
Munich Show
2000
Sainte Marie Show
Munich Show
2001
Sainte Marie Show
Munich Show
2002
Tucson Show
Sainte Marie Show
Denver Show
Munich Show
2003
Tucson Show
Sainte Marie Show
East Coast Show
Denver Show
Munich Show
2004
Tucson Show
West Coast Show
East Coast Show
Denver Show
Munich Show
2005
Tucson Show
West Coast Show
East Coast Show
Denver Show
Munich Show
2006
Tucson Show
Bologna Show
Sainte Marie Show
East Coast Show
Munich Show
2007
Tucson Show
Dallas Show
East Coast Show
Denver Show
Munich Show
2008
Tucson Show
West Coast Show
East Coast Show
Denver Show
Munich Show
2009
Tucson Show
West Coast Show
East Coast Show
Denver Show
Munich Show

2010
Tucson Show
San Francisco Show
East Coast Show
Denver Show

Munich Show

2011
Tucson Show
San Francisco Show
East Coast Show
Denver Show
Munich Show

2012
Tucson Show
West Coast Show
East Coast Show
Denver Show 
Munich Show

2013
Tucson Show
Sainte Marie Show
Crystal Days (Poland)
Munich Show  

 

 
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